Welcome to the The Garage Journal Board forums.

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest which gives you limited access to view most discussions and access our other features. By joining our free community you will have access to post topics, communicate privately with other members (PM), respond to polls, upload content and access many other special features. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join our community today!

If you have any problems with the registration process or your account login, please contact contact us.

Go Back   The Garage Journal Board > The Garage > General Garage Discussion

Sponsored Links (Register now to hide all advertisements)

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 03-22-2012, 12:40 PM   #21
beerdog
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Buffalo Grove, IL
Posts: 374
Default Re: Compressor Air Lines

There is a reason black pipe is pretty much the standard air line throughout industry. It is cheap, dependable, and works. Use black pipe. You can't go wrong.
beerdog is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-22-2012, 01:08 PM   #22
Chuck McB
Senior Member
 
Chuck McB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Alabama
Posts: 598
Default Re: Compressor Air Lines

Black iron pipe all the way with no regrets later.
Chuck McB is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links (Register now to hide all advertisements)
Old 03-22-2012, 01:59 PM   #23
pattenp
Senior Member
 
pattenp's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Virginia - USA
Posts: 5,816
Default Re: Compressor Air Lines

Other than the internal corrosion over time from moisture in the line.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chuck McB View Post
Black iron pipe all the way with no regrets later.
pattenp is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-22-2012, 02:46 PM   #24
Chuck McB
Senior Member
 
Chuck McB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Alabama
Posts: 598
Default Re: Compressor Air Lines

I'm coming up on 50 so if a black iron air line system survives say 30 or 40 years I'll be happy.BTW use a water separator at the compressor & an oiler .

Last edited by Chuck McB; 03-22-2012 at 02:48 PM.
Chuck McB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-22-2012, 03:07 PM   #25
POPSTAGE2
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Wi
Posts: 25
Default Re: Compressor Air Lines

I worked at a new car dealership that used PVC in the body shop. Someone left the compressor on one night that had nothing to do with the explosion other than the fact it exploded when nobody was in the shop.
It made quite the mess, and I would not want to be in there when it happened!!
It was near the ceiling where they used a bigger diameter PVC.
POPSTAGE2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-22-2012, 03:35 PM   #26
GeorgiaHybrid
Senior Member
 
GeorgiaHybrid's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Extreme NW Georgia
Posts: 3,763
Default Re: Compressor Air Lines

Your friend should be familiar with copper pipe, have him run type "L" copper around the shop. it's easy to solder, looks good, is easy to modify if your needs change, it should always be available (what if Rapid Aire goes out of business?) and you don't need to worry about rust in your air system.

My big complaint with plastic airline (made for compressed air use) is the appearance on the wall. It sags and droops between supports and the connectors are more expensive than copper pipe.
GeorgiaHybrid is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-22-2012, 03:50 PM   #27
Outlawmws
Senior Member
 
Outlawmws's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: The Badlands
Posts: 14,958
Default Re: Compressor Air Lines

Quote:
Originally Posted by jake26 View Post
http://www.osha.gov/dts/hib/hib_data/hib19880520.html

The Department of Labor & Industries warned consumers and employers in May 1988 that plastic-polyvinyl- chloride (PVC) pipe cannot be used in compressed air piping systems without risk of explosion. By law, employers must protect their workers by avoiding the use of unapproved PVC pipe in such systems.

Not sure if this has changed.
It hasn't...
__________________
-Outlaw


Outlaw's Shed Thread




Outlaw's Garage Sale - For sale or trade... Last Update w/new items 8/21/2012 - P9, (More auto books)

Outlaw's Garage sale - Feedback


"It might be for sale or trade, it never hurts to ask..."
Outlawmws is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 03-22-2012, 04:03 PM   #28
ptschram
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: In a Snap-On truck somewhere around Churubusco, IN
Posts: 2,029
Default Re: Compressor Air Lines

I like my nylon air lines.
ptschram is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-22-2012, 05:31 PM   #29
akdiesel
Alliance Member
 
akdiesel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Wasilla, AK
Posts: 2,076
Default Re: Compressor Air Lines

Most people will support their choice of product simply cause they don't want to admit to failure if that certain product has deficiencies.
With that being said the copper or black pipe. Type L copper or schedule 40 would be fine for any air system.
Black pipe rust concerns are valid if you have lots of moisture in your air, and if so than you need to worry more about your tools more than your pipe since they are going to be first to take the hit. Eliminate the moisture first and then no problem.
akdiesel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-22-2012, 06:13 PM   #30
Ben Buck
Senior Member
 
Ben Buck's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: S. W. Ohio
Posts: 436
Default Re: Compressor Air Lines

KA_ BOOM !!! Here it is AGAIN !!. . I'm going to drink another beer, and listen for the EXPLOSION !!
Ben Buck is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-10-2012, 02:42 PM   #31
BARN ONE
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: missouri
Posts: 76
Default Re: Compressor Air Lines

I used 1/2" heavy wall conduit for air lines. My buddy is an electrician and gave me a bunch of it, so the price was right. It is the same size as 1/2" black pipe, but conduit has straight threads and pipe thread is tapered. So I cut the ends off and rethreaded it. It works great, I have over 100" of run through the building and its been in use over 15 years now.

I have the compressor at the other end of the building, away from my shop, to save shop space and keep the noise down. I installed a on off switch in the shop by the work bench to remotely turn the compressor on. I don't like to leave the compressor on when I am not there, so to make sure, just in case I forget to turn it off, I used a spring wound timer switch. You can turn it on for 1 hour at a time, then it times out and turns off.
I also installed a pressure guage over the bench to easily see what pressure I have.
BARN ONE is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump

Sponsored Links (Register now to hide all advertisements)


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:07 PM.