Welcome to the The Garage Journal Board forums.

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest which gives you limited access to view most discussions and access our other features. By joining our free community you will have access to post topics, communicate privately with other members (PM), respond to polls, upload content and access many other special features. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join our community today!

If you have any problems with the registration process or your account login, please contact contact us.

Go Back   The Garage Journal Board > The Tools > Vintage Tool Discussion

Sponsored Links (Register now to hide all advertisements)

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 04-16-2012, 05:00 PM   #1
jtbinvalrico
Senior Member
 
jtbinvalrico's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 844
Default 1952 Craftsman "100" DP resto

Here goes the resto:

Bearings and actions are smooth. Everything is there except for the engine-turned "headband" around the top. I've been wanting to do one of these in "power bronze", and I'll be fabricating the headband to complete it.

I disassembled it today.....I want to thank the person who assembled this 60-odd years ago, your proper use of lubricant made disassembly a breeze. I never thought I'd see a column I could simply loosen and lift out! The motor ran fine, but I disassembled it anyway and found one of the bearings choked with debris and the other one shot......ordered two new bearings today.

Here's some pics:

Despite the careful assembly way back when, it seems the seller's grandfather was the last person who took care of this DP....seems the rest of the family left it to rust:





It took at least one knock on the head.....hopefully this tag can be rebuilt and touched up:



A good reason to open up a motor even if it runs......plus it had the original two-prong ungrounded plug:



Between stretches of grinding off rust and muck, I like to take a few parts and renew them........some before and after pics:















I'll update as it progresses.......for now, this box of parts awaits:



jtbinvalrico is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-16-2012, 05:15 PM   #2
Outlawmws
Senior Member
 
Outlawmws's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: The Badlands
Posts: 21,361
Default Re: 1952 Craftsman "100" DP resto

Great start!
__________________



NINE's (Nine4GMC) Flood recovery thread: Please help if you can; at least give him and his some moral support!


Outlaw's Camp Gear Thread
Outlaw's Shed Thread

Outlaw's Garage Sale
- For sale or trade... Last Update w/new items 8/21/2012 - P9, (More auto books)
Outlaw's Garage sale - Feedback
"It might be for sale or trade, it never hurts to ask..."
Outlawmws is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links (Register now to hide all advertisements)
Old 04-16-2012, 08:43 PM   #3
str8axle55
Senior Member
 
str8axle55's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Ma
Posts: 377
Default Re: 1952 Craftsman "100" DP resto

Wow, awesome work, that will be a great machine when you are done.
str8axle55 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-16-2012, 08:50 PM   #4
scott37300
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 3,451
Default Re: 1952 Craftsman "100" DP resto

Any details about the steps you did to get the handle, chuck, other parts to look that good?
scott37300 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-16-2012, 09:55 PM   #5
jtbinvalrico
Senior Member
 
jtbinvalrico's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 844
Default Re: 1952 Craftsman "100" DP resto

As a rule, any part of a resto that is round and can spin in the lathe, gets resto'd on the lathe. Knobs, rods, levers get the following treatment: Chuck the piece in and get some sandpaper. Run it at 1500-2000 rpm. On this particular knob I started with 100gr, then progressed through 150, 220, 400, 600, 800, and 1000. I continued turning the knob while I applied some metal polish (in this case, Mother's aluminum) and then buffed it out with a cloth as it was spinning.

Make sure that you use the 100gr enough to get out any imperfections, pitting, or dings before progressing. You may need to start with 60gr for really banged up pieces. I'm planning on doing the same thing for the column, although that's going to take a bit of rigging.

The odd parts like the quill and chuck start on the wire wheel then are done by hand with metal polish......a buffing wheel would work nicely too.
jtbinvalrico is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-17-2012, 10:13 AM   #6
jtbinvalrico
Senior Member
 
jtbinvalrico's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 844
Default Re: 1952 Craftsman "100" DP resto

Here's a link to a video I made showing the polishing of one of the feed levers:

Before:


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bLF_m...ature=youtu.be

After:
jtbinvalrico is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-23-2012, 10:24 PM   #7
dieselmike
Senior Member
 
dieselmike's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: BC
Posts: 801
Default Re: 1952 Craftsman "100" DP resto

how did you clean up the plastic? if you turn the column to get out the pitting, its OD will be too small to properly fit the base, head, etc..
__________________
dieselmike is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-23-2012, 10:38 PM   #8
ckadams00
Senior Member
 
ckadams00's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Chicago, IL
Posts: 1,091
Default Re: 1952 Craftsman "100" DP resto

Awesome! Keep the photos coming!
__________________
“They’ve done studies, you know. Sixty percent of the time, it works every time.” — Anchorman

Really appreciate feedback on purchases! Thanks!
http://www.garagejournal.com/forum/s...d.php?t=149307

Stop by my (very small) shop!http://www.garagejournal.com/forum/s...d.php?t=139136
ckadams00 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-23-2012, 11:11 PM   #9
jtbinvalrico
Senior Member
 
jtbinvalrico's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 844
Default Re: 1952 Craftsman "100" DP resto

Thanks guys......I find that the key to getting good looking plastic is to buy good looking plastic . Seriously, as long as they are in good shape to begin with, like these handles were, you can "turn" them. By good shape, I mean no cracks, structurally sound, etc. You can get worn handles to look really nice by turning them and using a cloth with an abrasive polish. I used a dab of Mother's since it was handy. If they are in worse shape, you'll have to start with a rougher grit.

The same applies to the column....sorta. You have to start with one that's got only surface rust. You're right, going deep enough to get out deep pitting would compromise the fit. I'll take a negligible amount off to polish this column.

Here's a progress update:

Even little things like a chuck key can brought back to life and used for another 60 years. This key was straightened and cleaned up:





I used a wire wheel to clean the gunk and old chrome off this handle.......Finished it off with 1000gr wet and metal polish:





This tilt indicator required some special treatment because I didn't want to destroy the numbers and lines....I lightly polished it with Mother's. It's got a bit of a line across it, but it's not worth damaging it to get it out:





The nameplate is in pretty bad shape:



I'm going to keep a long-term eye out for another nameplate, but in the meantime I'll build a new nameplate. Starting with a sheet of aluminum:



Secured to a board and put through the grits, ending at 1000gr wet and some metal polish:







Present plan is to place a decal over that polished plate to create a new one:



I continue to work on the smaller bits as I complete a steady-rest for my lathe so I can polish the column. Things will move pretty quickly once the column is polished and back in the base. Hoping to do some painting next week.
jtbinvalrico is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-24-2012, 01:02 AM   #10
Rust
Banned
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: The Path of Least Resistance
Posts: 539
Default Re: 1952 Craftsman "100" DP resto

Wow nice work!
Your gonna need sunglasses to run that machine.
Rust is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-24-2012, 01:14 AM   #11
rockchucker
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Seattle WA
Posts: 1,764
Default Re: 1952 Craftsman "100" DP resto

Very nice. Keep it up!
__________________


Sig by FairladyZ90


"It took you longer to explain why you were doing it wrong than it would have to do it right in the first place." -Some Old Dude

"All it takes is Time and Pressure..." -Some Old Dude
rockchucker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-24-2012, 01:15 AM   #12
amaes
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Chandler, AZ
Posts: 60
Default Re: 1952 Craftsman "100" DP resto

Here is a thread on the Bicycle site I'm on that might help you create a new badge for it. I've done this on a few custom bikes.

http://www.ratrodbikes.com/forum/vie...lit=head+badge
amaes is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-24-2012, 06:55 AM   #13
kc-steve
Senior Member
 
kc-steve's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Kansas City
Posts: 4,242
Default Re: 1952 Craftsman "100" DP resto

Thanks jt. Nice to read about tips like that.

I accidentally found that when you use a worn out flap disk and grinder it also tends to polish metal instead of sand it.

Steve
__________________
Junkyard Tools rescued from the junkyard

Feedback
kc-steve is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-24-2012, 10:01 PM   #14
jtbinvalrico
Senior Member
 
jtbinvalrico's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 844
Default Re: 1952 Craftsman "100" DP resto

amaes......That guy's work is impressive. I dare say my emblem reproduction is tame compared to that.

Progression of an aluminum part that was originally plated:



After the wire wheel.....note the casting line across the part:


Casting line smoothed off.....100gr:


150gr:


220gr:


400gr wet:


600gr wet:


800gr wet:


1000gr wet:


After metal polish......a can of Mother's and a rag. Bolted up to the depth stop:


Cleaned up a few other pieces and started paint. The "done" pile is growing:

jtbinvalrico is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-24-2012, 10:18 PM   #15
ckadams00
Senior Member
 
ckadams00's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Chicago, IL
Posts: 1,091
Default Re: 1952 Craftsman "100" DP resto

Hey JT your work is putting my restos to shame (stop it man, the chicks are gonna notice) - on the sandpaper progression how are you doing that - hand, grinder, wheel, what?
__________________
“They’ve done studies, you know. Sixty percent of the time, it works every time.” — Anchorman

Really appreciate feedback on purchases! Thanks!
http://www.garagejournal.com/forum/s...d.php?t=149307

Stop by my (very small) shop!http://www.garagejournal.com/forum/s...d.php?t=139136
ckadams00 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-24-2012, 11:08 PM   #16
MechManiac
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Trinidad and Tobago.
Posts: 75
Default Re: 1952 Craftsman "100" DP resto

Beautiful work!
MechManiac is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-26-2012, 07:22 AM   #17
jtbinvalrico
Senior Member
 
jtbinvalrico's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 844
Default Re: 1952 Craftsman "100" DP resto

ckadams00.......the progression begins on the wire wheel to remove rust, corrosion, or a trashed old plated finish. Next is hand sanding 100-1000gr, then hand polishing with Mother's metal polish. Admittedly, the process could be sped up by using cloth wheels on a bench grinder, but I've got all these grits on hand and I'm not in a big rush.
jtbinvalrico is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-26-2012, 09:00 AM   #18
jtbinvalrico
Senior Member
 
jtbinvalrico's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 844
Default Re: 1952 Craftsman "100" DP resto

This is a basic, average-guy motor assembly using only basic tools. I used a very basic bearing puller for disassembly. I got the new motor bearings in and ran a bench test. Here's the reassembly:

The parts, with the end caps painted:


End cap (not containing the switch) with the air cone bolted in to the inside of it. Set this part aside for now:


Other end cap (will contain the switch):


Start by mounting the overload protector:


Next, set the switch shield into the end cap over the screw holes:


Then set the piece of switch insulation over the shield:


Place the switch over the insulation and shield and screw them into the end cap:


At this point, you are going to have bring the stator assembly in closer to the end cap because the lengths of wire are shorter. Continue by mounting the terminal bar to the endcap:


While mounting the terminal bar, you may have to turn the stator assembly on its side and reach through with a long screwdriver to tighten the screws:


Be sure to pull these two wires through the opening (you should have marked them for proper attachment during disassembly):


Stand the stator assembly on its end and place the end cap over it. Some considerations....the metal tabs on the edge of the cap locate it correctly on the stator assembly, but you need to make sure that the bolt holes line up with the cut-outs on the side of the assembly; be sure to route the wires carefully - the rotor needs to be able to spin unimpeded in that space; as the wires come out of the end cap, make sure they aren't going to be pinched during reassembly:


Rotor assembly:


Carefully flip the end cap / stator assembly over and place it on something you can pass things through, in this case I used a partially opened vise:


Place the rotor assembly into the stator assembly so that the governor will be in contact with the motor switch mounted in the end cap:


Place the other end cap over the stator assembly, again being careful to line up the bolt holes. Then install a couple of the through-bolts to keep everything together and lined up:


Place one of the bearings over the shaft and locate it on the machined bore of the end cap. Find a socket that is the same diameter as the machined bore; the idea is to put the pressure on the outermost edge of the bearing. Use some sockets and some light, square taps with a hammer to set the bearing in. This should not take a whole lot of banging to get done:


This end of the motor gets the bearing spring. Situate it on the bearing and install the bearing cover:




Do the same thing on the other end of the motor:


Set the motor on the bench, tighten the bearing covers down, install the remaining through bolts, and spin the motor shaft by hand to check for smooth, unimpeded movement:


Wire up a plug and bench test....be careful, it might jump a little when it comes on:


That's the motor bench test. This one is silky smooth and ready for another 60 years of service. The original decorative metal band was corroded and the finish was shot. I'll be making a new one with an engine-turned finish, then I'll complete the motor base assembly.

Obviously, the availability and use of proper tools and presses can make this job easier. I found disassembly to be straightforward....remove the motor from its base, remove the bearing cover plates, and remove the four through bolts. I used one of my pullers to remove the non-switch end cap, and then the bearing after that (they may come off in a different order, depending on their condition). You want to do your best not to beat up the wiring inside. By now, you can partially separate the other end cap from the stator. I then use a long-handled screwdriver to reach in and loosen the six screws used to mount the overload protector, terminal plate, and switch assembly. After doing this, tension will come off the wires and you can finish pulling the thing apart and get at the final bearing.......Again, this is just a layman's way of getting it done.
jtbinvalrico is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-26-2012, 10:03 PM   #19
Omphaloskeptic
Senior Member
 
Omphaloskeptic's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Ultima Ratio, Wa.
Posts: 2,346
Default Re: 1952 Craftsman "100" DP resto

Nicely documented and described!

Thank you.
Omphaloskeptic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-29-2012, 10:39 PM   #20
jtbinvalrico
Senior Member
 
jtbinvalrico's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 844
Default Re: 1952 Craftsman "100" DP resto

The next step is the cleaning and polishing of the column. This requires the building of a steady rest for my lathe. Follow along for rookie welding entertainment: http://www.garagejournal.com/forum/s...66#post2290266
jtbinvalrico is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump

Sponsored Links (Register now to hide all advertisements)


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:55 PM.